Can You Remount Ski Bindings? (Here is the Answer)

Can You Remount Ski Bindings

Are you having trouble keeping up with your mates or turning at speed while skiing down a mountain slope?

More often than not, skiers who change their boots or other equipment have difficulty replicating their earlier performance. This is because the boots might not sit on the ski like they used to, thereby compromising on power, precision, and stability.

That’s why today we will tell you all about remounting ski bindings.

Can You Remount Skis Bindings? 

Yes, you can remount ski bindings, especially with children and teenagers, as their feet are in the growing stage. But it is slightly uncommon among adults though not completely rare. 

The most important thing is to determine the condition of the bindings; test the mechanism to check if they release at the correct pressure. In some cases, readjusting rather than replacing ski bindings might allow skiers to improve their performance as it offers more control. 

Why Should I Remount Ski Bindings? 

There are several reasons to remount ski bindings, but it all comes down to performance. 

For instance, a growing foot size, using second-hand skiing equipment, or altering the position of the skis are some of the most common reasons. Other than that, remounting hard skis to a forward position will help you make smoother turns. 

Not to mention, it increases stability and guarantees better floatation for the best skiing experience. 

Is It Bad To Remount Ski Bindings? 

Contrary to what many skiers might think, remounting bindings isn’t bad, and there are no downsides. That said, you must ensure that the equipment is in top shape and there are no signs of damage. 

For stability, you may remount ski bindings backward for more floatation and less response. On the flip side, for better response and smoother turns, position the bindings forward to generate more power. 

But if you find that the bindings have become frayed or the holes have succumbed to wear and tear, it would be best to get them replaced. 

How Much Does It Cost To Remount Ski Bindings? 

Remounting ski bindings is common, and it does not cost a lot of money. However, prices may vary, depending on the region and the season. 

In most cases, you can remount ski bindings for around $45, but there are ways to cut costs further. For example, look for stores that offer a discount on bulk purchases and you can get all the equipment from one shop. 

Additionally, ski resorts often welcome people with season passes during winter, and offer remounting services free of cost. 

How Many Times Can You Remount Ski Bindings? 

Remounting isn’t a permanent solution; you will have to replace the equipment sooner rather than later. So, we’d suggest refraining from remounting ski bindings more than three times to reduce the risk of damage and accidents. 

This is because you will have to drill new holes at least 8mm away from the previous position. Despite the sturdiness of the material, frequent drilling will weaken the structure. 

However, if remounting is your only option, fill up the old holes using epoxy. 

Can I Remount Ski Bindings On My Own? 

It isn’t uncommon for skiers to remount ski bindings, provided they know what they are doing. But if you don’t, the best option would be to take the equipment to a ski shop and let a professional handle it. 

We have found that improper installation of ski bindings may increase the chances of accidents. In fact, you could damage the skis while also hurting yourself. 

But if you are determined to do it yourself, practice the technique on an old pair of skis first. 

FAQs: 

Can I Use The Same Holes To Remount Ski Bindings? 

You can use the same holes for remounting ski bindings, provided they are compatible. So, before drilling the holes, make sure that the bindings are universal and they match the boots. 

However, if you find that the threads are frayed, it would help to drill new holes. 

In most cases, it’s essential to adjust the bindings, depending on the skiing expedition. For instance, regular skiing is different from backcountry or alpine skiing, so the manner of binding will vary. 

Is Remounting Ski Bindings Common? 

Yes, remounting ski bindings is common, but mostly with the younger generation. As kids and teenagers have growing feet, remounting offers an efficient solution because it’s not possible to buy new equipment frequently. 

On the other hand, grown feet may not be suitable for this adjustment technique. If you have trouble using the equipment, we’d suggest opting for a replacement. 

Irrespective of your choice, get the remounting done in any professional store for the best results. 

Do I Need To Remount The Bindings For Used Skies? 

It is common for skiers to buy or borrow second-hand equipment, especially for those new to skiing. However, remounting depends on the previous owner’s boot size. 

If you share the same boot size, there’s no need for adjustments, but you will need to drill new holes when there are variations. That said, one size larger or smaller boots won’t need redrilling, and you may use the current configurations. 

For anything equivalent to or larger than two sizes, it’s essential to drill new holes and move the bindings forward or backward. 

Final Thoughts 

Are you confident about rediscovering your skiing prowess by remounting ski bindings? 

Instead of opting for a costly replacement, it would be best to give the equipment a once-over. Try to find out what is causing you discomfort and check with a professional if remounting would help. 

If they answer in the affirmative, make sure to measure out the holes before drilling. Might we recommend doing this under expert supervision till you get the hang of it? Because the last thing you would want is to damage the ski. 

Rest assured; if done correctly, remounting will help you ski with panache through any winter wonderland. 

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Matt Scofield
Matt Scofield

Hi! I’m Matt, an adventure freak who lives and breathes the great outdoors. Spending time under the open sky always appealed to me, even as a kid. Perhaps that’s why I liked camping with my dad so much. The days spent hiking and the nights around the campfire are times I’ll cherish forever.

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