Do You Wear Ski Goggles Under or Over Helmet?

goggles under or over helmet

Comfort and style may not always go hand-in-hand when you are snowboarding. 

Perhaps that’s why you often see the cool kids at the snow park with their goggles wedged under their helmets despite the straps piercing the back of their heads. After all, that’s how the pros wore it at the recent Winter Olympics.

Others rely on their snowboarding tricks to do the talking and go the unfashionable way — with the strap over the helmet and gloves over their sleeves. 

So, which will you choose — goggles under or over helmet? Read our guide before you answer today’s burning question. 

Is Wearing Goggles Under The Helmet Dangerous?

Considering how you are contemplating ways to wear goggles with the all-important helmet, you are already in much safer hands. Needless to say, wearing a helmet saves lives and allows you to shred one more day.

And while wearing goggles under the helmet is more of a style statement, it may expose you to a higher risk of injury in case of a crash. This is especially true for older models of goggle straps with huge plastic strips that may dig into your head if you tumble.

Wearing Ski Goggles Under Or Over Helmet?

Most snowboarding enthusiasts cite comfort, safety, and the convenience of removing goggles for a quick chat as some of the compelling reasons for wearing them over a helmet.

However, considering the growing popularity of hiding away the straps for the style factor, goggles manufacturers are now bridging the gap with designs to accommodate this trend.

There are many reasons that snowboarding enthusiasts recommend wear goggles over the helmet.

Comfortable and Safe

For a long time, wearing goggles over the helmet was considered the most practical and comfortable method. And indeed, older models consist of bulky straps that block the padding and dig into the skin.

Some models come with a clip that is not completely flat on the back to hold straps in place, which would be most uncomfortable directly against the head and could potentially cause injury if you wear the goggle under the helmet.

More recently, manufacturers have begun pumping out models with comfortable straps designed to go under the helmet.

Not to mention that the strap over the helmet minimizes air flow, so you’ll stay warmer.

Easy Removal

For ease of removal, many prefer straps over the helmet as this placement allows you to remove or raise the goggles without taking off the helmet. However, this may be a non-issue as the snowboarders’ community share that there are hardly any reasons to remove just one or the other.

Moreover, snowboarding enthusiasts with a knack for listening to music on the slopes find that straps over the helmet make it easy to wear, remove, and keep earplugs in.

Style 

Helmets by themselves can be a bit more of a personal preference on the slopes. Though a strap running over the helmet may eclipse intrinsic designs or stickers you wish to show off while snowboarding, wearing your goggles over the helmet provides a sleeker and more professional look.

Why Do Skiers Wear Goggles Under Helmet?

For the most part, snowboarding and ski goggles are used interchangeably as they perform the same functions, such as protection against adverse weather conditions, anti-glare features, and so on. That said, skiers may prefer to wear goggles under their helmets for the same reasons as snowboarders.

More Goggles Tips To look Like A Pro

Pro-snowboarders rely on the sport for their bread and butter. Any severe injuries would mean they would have to give up their career, or worse — their passion. Needless to say, looking like a pro would suggest investing in the best equipment and following safe practices. 

Keeping that in mind, here are a few tips to help you snowboard like a pro and avoid goggle issues on the slopes:

Wear A Beanie Under The Helmet

A balaclava, beanie, buff, or even a hooded ski jacket — these are some of the most common hats that the pros wear under their helmets. For the most part, wearing a hat underneath provides extra warmth and an increasingly snug fit. 

Additionally, an absorbent beanie or buff may soak up sweat to prevent the lenses from fogging up. Needless to say, a blurry vision puts you on the fast-track to a faceplant in the snow.  

Wear Contact Lenses

Considering how not all goggles are designed to accommodate glasses, you may want to switch to contact lenses before a ski trip. Apart from narrowing down your options, glasses tend to steam and fog up rapidly. 

And indeed, wiping your spectacles every few minutes takes away from the precious time you could spend practicing and honing your skills. 

Loosen Your Googles

Loosen the straps on your goggles, but don’t let them hang too loose. After all, you don’t want them to slide down your nose or fly off as you perform a nose grab. However, if your goggles leave marks on your face, it is perhaps best to adjust the straps.

That said, leaving some space between your face and the goggles ensures that moisture does not get trapped, preventing the lens from fogging up. 

Take Off The Goggles

While taking a breather, you may be tempted to remove the helmet and wear the goggles on your head like a headband. Although this look may have a relaxed or laidback factor, it is also a recipe for moisture to gather. 

Most pros who attempt to sport this style ensure that they are wearing a beanie to act as a buffer between the skin or hair and the goggles. 

Final Thoughts 

You don’t necessarily need a limited-edition helmet or the most expensive snowboard to look like a pro snowboarder. At the same time, you need not follow trends and mimic how athletes wear their goggles just to impress the kids at the park. 

Of course, having skills to match the athletes is the easiest way to look like one, but that may not be in everyone’s cards. 

However, small changes, such as tucking the gloves in, pulling down trousers over the boots, and wearing goggles under the helmet, can help you look slicker. Additionally, you can follow our nifty tips to get one step closer to looking like a pro, even if you cannot perform double backflips on the snow. 

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Katelyn Talton
Katelyn Talton

Katelyn is a dedicated nature-enthusiast and outdoor adventurer. She started leading canoeing and hiking expeditions in her teens and never stopped. Katelyn loves to be active; whether it’s biking across town or spending an entire season camping far away from civilization—she does whatever makes her happy.

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